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Category: Design

Architecture August 2015

In-dependency

582_Poolbeg_Opt1a

The towers at Poolbeg may no longer be in use and though the ESB has shelved plans for their demolition there remains a gap that requires resolution.  Other proposals, from the fanciful to the practical have been made to which we are adding the obvious.  As both a symbol of a new era in abundant energy from non traditional resources (those other than the burning of coal, gas, oil or nuclear fuels) the ESB could re-purpose the towers to wind power.

582_Poolbeg_Opt2a

While the elements require some strengthening (internal steel lattice) they could be the masts to two elegant windmills.  This would be a potent symbol for an energy independent future right at the gateway to Dublin and Ireland.  Moreover this would be a wonderful opportunity to provide a test bed for newer blade technologies.  Glinting in the sun and riding high on the winds they would be a welcome addition to the  windsurfers on Bull Island at the heart of the designated UNESCO Biosphere.

582_Poolbeg_Opt3a

NJBA A+U

previously posted on linkedin

Architecture March 2015

 Innisfree Architectural Competition Entry by NJBA A+U

View of Portal

View of Portal

THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE William Butler Yeats, 1892

 

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,

And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made; 

Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honeybee, 

And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow, 

Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings; 

There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow, 

And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

I will arise and go now, for always night and day 

I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore; 

While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey, 

I hear it in the deep heart’s core.

Portal (from above)

Portal (from above)

Somewhere between the city and Innisfree the poem exists as a portal to that other life, a life lived simply, a life experienced in innocence at one with the earth, alone. It suggests that the poet dreams of a self sufficient existence, sustained by beans and honey.  This project cannot wholly answer all of this.  In all conscience we cannot truly build a small cabin of clay and wattles.  Instead a portal has been created.  Like the valley temples along the Nile we have prepared a structure to accept the arriving visitor.  As a portal it receives the visitor preparing for their landing as well as being the point from which the visitor leaves.

Structure of Portal

Structure of Portal

We have calculated that this is the most minimal point of interference where you can hear “lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore”.  The structure is a simple timber frame on steel piles.  The roof consists of a suspension system using steel wire and sail cloth (for both weathering and structure).  Beneath this translucent roof an inner cloak of raw linen is draped.  This later element is inspired by the reference to an “evening full of the linnet’s wings”.  The Linnet is so named because of its link to the eating of flax seeds.  The shape of the portal roof is wing like.  Underneath the translucent roof are two boardwalks that take the visitor on and off the island to the waiting boat.  Floating lightly above the waves the whole structure can be easily removed leaving the island untouched. (from original competition report)

Arriving at Innisfree

Arriving at Innisfree

This approach is antithetical to the creation for a folly like architecture for the purposes of the competition.  Instead it sough to get out of the way, providing a portal, a gateway though which the visitor passes form the outside world to that sacred world of the mind on the island to which the poet seeks refuge.

 

Design June 2014

Pylons 

The opportunities that “made to demand” technologies offer multiply by the day.  The myriad of choices available to the market make it difficult to discern a trend or even a design orthodoxy.  In many ways this is the great advantage of the new industrial landscape.

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Without the traditional infrastructure of client led inquiry or demand after years of working on the periphery with independent research projects Synthetic Reality is with various partners like FAB all things able to bring products to the market.   Of course this presumes the market really wants these things.

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Perhaps the market does not know what it wants until it is produced, make it and they will buy to paraphrase that oft used quote from the Field of Dreams.  Reflecting on the work we have undertaken in the last 4 years dreams have come to the fore.  A type of surrealism or rather surrealist humor appears to find their way into the work.

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Even here, the use of an industrialized motif as the framework to art or craft hints at the industrialized origins of most jewelry and echoes the earliest origins of jewelry; bead making, which gave rise to some of the first industrialized practices in the ancient world.  These and other bespoke industrialized products are available from FAB all things

Synthetic Reality’s range of products are;

Pylons Jewelry Tree: http://www.faballthings.com/products/pylons

Chain-mail Phone Case: http://www.faballthings.com/products/chain-mail

Baubles Ear Rings – Nylon : http://www.faballthings.com/products/baubles-earrings-white

Baubles Ear Rings – Steel http://www.faballthings.com/products/baubles-earrings-stainless-steel

Botanic Wall Art: http://www.faballthings.com/products/botanic-gardens

 

 

 

Writing March 2014

NJB_Rice_1 

 the near, far and the in-between

(Neither Out Far Nor In Deep) [1]

The closest I was to Peter Rice was on the other side of a glass wall in what amounted to a gold fish bowl of an office in the basement of Norman Foster’s Office off Portland Place.  That was in 1986, a much different time and place.  We exchanged a glance shared by the Irish abroad finding comfort in recognising a fellow country man at distance.  Maybe it was some primal recognition of genetic origins, of facial traits, or bearing or maybe it was just the tweed jacket I was sporting at the time.  Nonetheless, whatever the reasons that knowing glance was as close as I would ever get to the person, a mere acknowledgment as he disappeared into the dark.  Therefore unlike some of my colleagues here my knowledge of Peter is affected by distance.  It is on this theme of distance that I would like to address the colloquium and to present a framework for understanding the work.  Rice might even like that, or to paraphrase; “once the rules are established everything else is easy”. [2]

His work had already attained cult status and his name joined a litany of great Victorian Engineers; the Brunels, Paxton, Stephenson and Telford who joined those of the modern era; Ove Arup, Robert Maillart, Luigi Nervi and Frei Otto.  The study of engineering genius was still part of the core curriculum of the late modernist school.  The work was however mediated through a few choice magazines in an environment starved of content compared to the current overload.  As architecture students we absorbed everything we could assuming that this familiarity would breed intimacy with our subject.  Nothing, however, prepares you for the real thing.

 


[1] The near, far and the in-between or to use the title of the Robert Frost Poem used in the Traces of Peter Rice Exhibition Catalogue, Neither Out Far Nor in Deep

[2] An Engineer Imagines – Peter Rice Artemis 1998

“When designing the main steel elements we had created a language of design.  We had tubes in compression, solid rods in tension and cast elements for joints.  Once these rules had become established everything else was easy.” P. 42

 

NJB_Rice_3_4images notes 4, 5

 


 

near

Though it seemed Peter was close in space that day in Fosters, the glass wall created a distance that no words could ford.  Without those words and before his insightful memoire I was left with mute buildings.  I would like to share my thoughts from that time.  When you chance upon the Centre George Pompidou it assaults your senses unlike the framed image from the magazine.  Gone from your thoughts is the contrasting colour against the 18th and 19th century facades, gone is the organising mantra of the vertical factory or the audacious externalised services.  Instead there is this urban theatre, a grand gesture opening up a people’s plaza in front of the building’s permanent scaffolding.  Before long you approach and engage viscerally with the building.  Tightrope walkers and urban gymnasts hang out of tie bars and on ropes suspended between.  At least this is how it felt ten years after its completion.   My experience was the equivalent of undertaking an autopsy on architecture; everything was revealed; cause and effect.   Nowhere could the elevation be found; eroded in favour of a dynamic composition of action and observation.  Instead an all consuming logic prevailed.  The building revealed a Victorian faith in the machine as the embodiment of enlightenment, a device to transport you to the future; instantaneously.  However this was no brutal engagement, no mere expedient construction.  Instead a hierarchy had been crafted to provide clarity to the diagram.  Each logic element had its own expression, its own weight and texture; partly polished, partly matt, partly painted with some elements cast.  Though obsessively factory made, there was an invitation to touch.  Permission had neither been asked nor given but taken by the people.  The need to reach out and touch its alien presence in the city pulled everyone closer, in the same manner you would reach out to the giant column masses of medieval cathedrals.  As if to confirm their ability to hold high vast amounts of masonry I found myself similarly placing a hand on these massive columns.  To be able to embrace and become part of the affirming nature of its promise is the search for the true nature of its expression that Rice spoke about.

“The search for the authentic character of a material is at the heart of any approach to engineering design.”[1]   If it were false in any way, if its material masqueraded as another all would be undone.  In photographs it was impossible to ascertain this truth.  In touching the thing itself it is revealed.


[1] An Engineer Imagines – Peter Rice Artemis 1998 P. 78

NJB_Rice_7_8

 

far

However though we would desire it, much of architecture remains aloof or distant in time and space.  To fulfil our ambition to understand and reveal the truth of any work requires considerable effort, funds and commitment.  As a consequence, magazines and now the internet intercede to provide a simulacrum of intentions.  The extensive availability of digital photography has provided a bridge to distant places but this remains stubbornly disjointed.  That the work of Rice and the teams in which he has collaborated remains powerful at a distance is testament to the rigour with which the language of parts is conducted.  The clarity and discipline of roles within the structure becomes a signifier of sorts for Rice’s work.  Within each project the task assigned to the column, the wall, the beam, the glass, the frame are carefully described to allow them their own space within the overall concept.  The overarching conceptual framework has at its heart is a permanent scaffold that was premièred in Pompidou.  In the collaborative work with Renzo Piano this takes flight, literally in Kansai Airport and in de Menil where the ceiling articulation is like sheets (sails) in the wind.  As it was with Utzon a singular idea holds the attention from afar, directing the attention of the observer to a few memorable images, stunningly photographed.  Despite these photogenic qualities the idea manages to cross from its’ reality to the mind’s eye, even if “The sand we used was marble sand and the cement was white, which gave a sparkle to the finish of the surface,” is lost in translation. [1]  The assured dissection of the problem and distribution of elements to a system of classification is worthy of the best of the Victorian Scientists and Engineers.

The potential there is for cacophony is arrested by the desire for dialogue.  In the drawings, sketches and models the clues to the types of dialogue emerge in time to provide a platform for understanding the relevance of the work.

 


[1] An Engineer Imagines – Peter Rice Artemis 1998 P. 90

NJB_Rice_10_11

 

in-between

It is at the nexus between concept and reality, between idea and touch that the work really excels.  It is there that the dialogue between engineer and architect, between designer and builder, between client and user is resolved.  The modern propensity for segregated thinking and segregated responsibilities would be more than happy to see any attempt at dialogue framed by a system of ring fenced borders where trade is embargoed.  Rice attests to the fact that to him the border does not exist.  I am mindful of the use of these terms coming from the territory he occupied as a young man, close to where I grew up along the border invisible in life but permanent in the minds of some.  Though an internationalist he refused to be dragged across the border or worse occupy the no-man’s land as Architect-Engineer or Engineer-Architect.  He steadfastly retreated from this special category of refugee instead expanding the potential of engineer to embrace a foreign language by resorting to an international language of Architecture.  “I am and engineer, pure and simple.” [1] His efforts however provide us with a Rosetta stone made from drawing, modelling, building, testing, trying, failing and succeeding to guide us in our own endeavours.  The joint is the touchstone, a fulcrum, the point around which everything rotates.  Unfortunately the joint would later become festishised by impersonators.  For Rice though it is the resolution of parts, it is where we come to know the man that was once glimpsed at the bottom of the garden, or in the basement office, as someone worth knowing. “Often it is the expressionism of the jointing which humanises the structures and justifies their friendly feel.”  [2] This common human exchange is concretised in this final thing, the residue of the knowing glance, recognising similar traits, equal in our humanity, but different in contribution, where anything is possible if you only have the courage, “just courage, care and attention to detail, and above all belief and getting started.” [3]


[1] Traces of Peter Rice – Edited by Kevin Barry Lilliput Press 2012 Renzo Piano Quoting Rice P. 19

[2] An Engineer Imagines – Peter Rice Artemis 1998 P.26

[3] An Engineer Imagines – Peter Rice Artemis 1998  P.126

 

NJB_Rice_Last

the near, far and the in-between

(Neither Out Far Nor In Deep)

NCAD_RiceExhibit_Sydney_241013

© Noel J Brady 2013

presented as part of Peter Rice Colloquium at NCAD 2013

Image credits

hands:  http://www.centreculturelirlandais.com/modules/movie/scenes/home/index.php?fuseAction=popup&rubric=art&article=art_may2013

 geberette: http://www.engineering-timelines.com/who/Rice_P/ricePeter5.asp

 ironbridge:  http://www.sedgleymanor.com/people/abraham_darby.html

chalkboard: http://www.engineering-timelines.com/who/Rice_P/ricePeter3.asp

sydney sketch:  http://www.sydneycloseup.com/sydney-opera-house-facts.html

ibm: http://www.structuremag.org/article.aspx?articleID=476

scarpa: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/418623727834266390/

 

Architecture March 2014

Fulcrum – ARDS Peninsula Installation

The possibility of constructing architecture from standardized parts is a long held dream of the modern movement.  With a nostalgic view of the future some pioneers believed that the future could be transparent, functional, streamlined and efficient if it followed the dream of Henry Ford’s production line.  “More Ford than Marx”, went the catchphrase.   However industrialised processes in Architecture are neither new nor exclusively modern.  In ancient Rome the standardization of Brick production facilitated the building of an empire as did their standardisation of armour, currency and most especially roads.

NJBA_553_Design_Section

 

In an age of austerity industrialsed and standardised elements are often drawn upon to facilitate works that might not otherwise be affordable.  This is NJBA A+U’s entry for the Ards Peninsula competition which draws upon the limitations of material to surpass the usual.   

NJBA_553_Exploded_1

The proposal sees a tower constructed of standard plywood sheeting (with minimal cuts) fixed to a timber frame and using hinges to manufacture a triangular box.  Stacked in a pattern of twos these “boxes” would form a 5 storey tower accessed by a  stair ladder.  Designed to be placed anywhere in the park area Fulcrum would enable the viewer to engage with the trees or the coastline.  

SONY DSC

 

With rudimentary skills this tower can be erected on a relatively small footprint with its own concrete foundation.  The size of the panel systems easily provides the necessary protective environment safe.  And should the structure be considered meaningful through use the elements would provide the formwork for a more permanent concrete tower on the same platform.  

Architecture is too often seen without the myriad temporary structures that went into its construction.  Here the scaffold has become permanent, the formwork without the from, the standard identifying with the unique.

Design March 2014

srid_Chainmail1button

Synthetic Reality’s collaboration with FAB all things progresses.  Chainmail is now available for the iPhone on line with other models coming on line.

Chainmail_1

Designed to simulate chain mail it is an ideal demonstration of the potential of 3D printing.  Printed in red nylon the interwoven rings provide a dynamic surface behind which the phone may still be seen.

Chainmail_3The perfect accessory for a chainmail dress, perhaps.  The concept alludes to virtual security using a more ancient version of protection.

Design November 2013

 

 

FAB all things

Synthetic Reality’s first product is on the shelves.  Baubles are ear rings designed to be both ancient and futuristic.  The original design invovled interlocking cups but through the process of digital printing this has mellowed into these examples in nylon and stainless steel.

 FAB_Baubles_WhiteNylon

 The stainless steel version opened up a space between front and back.  The posibilities of printing metals has become available much sooner than Synthetic Reality expected. 

 FAB_Baubles_StainlessSteel

Working with FAB all things has given rise to new thoughts about old things, and dreams of new ones.  www.faballthings.com

Design March 2013

Compiling the final material for Version 12.3.1  Missed our publishing deadline for February but will be adding a new logo id and information related to Sky Horizon, see image.  This logo has been produced for architectural firm NJBA A+U for an interesting design installation.  More news on this towards the end of March.  In the meantime we will be concentrating on the Identities publication (12.3.1).  515_Logo

Writing

A selection of published material other than by 12 Publishers is now available on our website.  These mainly feature Architecture and Urban Design.  There are interviews with Architects such as Winy Maas, Glenn Murcutt, FOA, Juhani Pallasmaa, Craig Dykers, David Chipperfield as well as the Artist/Sculptor Michael Warren, see; http://www.12publishers.com/Writing.htm  The material is available as free pdf downloads under creative commons licensing.

Art

The first edition of Version was published in December 2012. Version 12.2.1 “the impossible memorial”, documents the memorial to victims of abuse (ireland) by NJBA A+U. THis is available via Blurb as a paperback, hardback or e-book. A preview of the publication is available on our site at; http://www.12publishers.com/12Publishers.htm

Version_12.2.1_BDustCover